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Conte di Savoia

INTRODUCTION

 

The Conte di Savoia came into existence in parallel with the Rex, of which she was the alter ego on the express route between Genoa and New York between 1932 and 1940. Both ships were brought into service by the Italia Flotte Riunite in the Autumn of 1932 but both had originally been ordered by rival companies and the only similarities between them were their dimensions, speed and hotel arrangements. They were conceived to compete with each other and it is interesting to note how very different they were. If the Rex, with her old-fashioned and neoclassic décor, could be defined as the last of the floating palaces, the Conte di Savoia represented an authentic revolution among ocean liners with her lounges in a genuinely Modern style. She was a masterpiece thanks to a Marriage Made in Heaven between the naval architect responsible for the project (Nicolò Costanzi, an able artist and aesthete) and the designer in charge of the interiors (Gustavo Pulitzer Finali).

 

To the Lloyd Sabaudo, who had ordered the Conte di Savoia, must be given the credit for having the courage to launch the original project (a classic of its kind), to pursue a revolutionary course and to propose a new stereotype for the décor of large ocean liners, based on the success, shortly before, of the motorship Victoria of the Lloyd Triestino which had been designed by the same team and built in the same shipyard. To be frank, the designs of Pulitzer and his team, the German architects Michael Rachlis and Georg Manner, were so modern that they scared the directors of the company to the point where they brought in Adolfo Coppedé to redesign the Ballroom in the most ornate Baroque style. This was a strange intrusion into such a futuristic ship, which was so much liked by American passengers that she attracted greater bookings than the Rex. However, she had to live in the shadow of her running-mate due to the latter's success in winning the Blue Riband. In this respect, it should be noted that it was to the Conte di Savoia that the honour was first given to make an attempt on the record.

 

"The ship that can't roll": publicity postcard illustrating to the public the gyro-stabylising system in a simple way.

In March, 1933 she crossed from Gibraltar to New York at an average speed of 27.53 knots, arriving at her destination a day earlier than scheduled but failing by less than 0.4 knots to beat the record then held by the German Europa. In fact, during her sea trials the Conte di Savoia had proved to be the faster of the two Italian liners and, for the first time an English publication recognised her technical superiority. Among her many innovations, we should remember that she was the first in the World to have an anti-roll system designed to counteract the dreaded mal de mer.

DATA SHEET

 

KEEL LAYING: 10/04/1930

LAUNCH: 10/28/1931

MAIDEN VOYAGE: Genova-New York 11/30/1932

SHIP YARD: Cantiere San Marco, Trieste

HULL NUMBER: 783

COMPANy: Italia Flotte Riunite (Italian Line), Genova

FLAG: Italian

DIMENSIONS:

LENGTH OVERALL: 815 ft

WIDTH: 96,1 ft

GROSS TONNAGE: 48502 t.

PROPULSION: 4 sets of geared turbines

SERVICE SPEED: 27,00 knots

TOP SPEED:  29,50 knots

POWER: 130.000 horsepower

HOTEL CAPACITY:

FIRST CLASS: 578

SECOND CLASS: 420

THIRD CLASS: 720

CREW: 786

FATE: 1939 in Malamocco near Venice 1950 april 24, sold to be broken up at Monfalcone

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CONTE DI SAVOIA SHOP

GENERAL ARRANGEMENT PLANS

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